Aug. 30th, 2017

Books, tv

Aug. 30th, 2017 12:25 pm
jack: (Default)
Russel's Attic #3

I think it was kaberett who put me onto these. Some people have not-exactly-supernatural-but-better-than-humanly-possible talent. Cas does maths, so well she can predict paths of bullets and other matrix-reminiscent stuff in real time. And works as a freelance "acquirer".

What's lovely is her relationship with the few people she works with, the PI, the hacker, the office assistant, where she's instinctively opposed to human connections at all, but comes to value a few of them anyway. And Rio, the scary I'm-a-sociopath-but-happen-to-be-on-your-side character.

One of the side stories is "Rio adopts a puppy" and it's, um, very moving, in good ways, but also, without anything very gory happening, rather emotionally scary too.

In book #3, we finally have Cas interacting with research mathematicians, and learning her opinions on various maths research, and it's really quite cool. If you like books about freelance mercenaries and cutting edge mathematical research.

Shambling Guide #2: Ghost Train to New Orleans

A protagonist sucked into working for a publishing house run by a vampire, writing a travel guide for supernatural creatures, the second volume now visiting New Orleans. I enjoyed it, maybe more than the first book, as the worldbuilding has settled down a bit, and it doesn't feel like everything that they encounter came out of nowhere.

Good place

A recent sitcom about a woman who goes to the afterlife, "your notions of heaven and hell are not exactly correct, but there's a good place, and a bad place", and is in the good place by mistake. Or rather, it gets more complicated than that, but that's the premise.

If you like comedy that regularly mentions Kant and Hume, this is it :) The humour isn't very intense, but isn't very cringeworthy, but the relaxed humorous tone lets it explore what that afterlife might be like in ways a more serious attempt wouldn't be able to.